Tag Archives: gift guide

Reissues that won’t be regifted

media gifts

Library Manifesto’s down-to-the-wire shopping suggestions for film and music.

1. Your special someone who thinks he’s heard it all: “A Band Called Death” DVD

Three teenagers formed the band Death in early-1970s Detroit. Directors Mark Covino and Jeff Howlett argue that they are the world’s first punk band.

2. Drinking buddy who doesn’t think it gets any better than The Beatles:  The Beatles “On Air Live at the BBC Volume 2”

The Beatles recorded hundreds of hours of footage at the BBC. “On Air” compiles performances from what some say was the band’s peak live show.

3. Documentary filmmaker intern you hired to follow you around: “Grey Gardens” on Blu-ray

Criterion Collection digitally restored Grey Gardens, a classic of cinema verite. The touch up gives the Maysles’ film a fresher look but all the quirks of Big Edie and Little Edie stay in tact.

4. Jazzy sister with the best vintage dresses: “Chick Webb & Ella Fitzgerald Decca Sessions (1934-41)”

Mosaic Records compiles the collaborative work of Chick Webb, an innovative drummer nicknamed “The King of Swing,” and the beloved Ella Fitzgerald. The collection sheds some light on the history of jazz.

5. Self gift – cause no one else would get it for you: Scott Walker “Scott: The Collection 1967-1970”

Scott Walker has always been an enigmatic person (he was most often photographed wearing dark sunglasses). This collection will help me get to know him better.

6. Neighbor who loves Turner Classic Movies: “James Dean: Ultimate Collector’s Edition” Blu-ray

Three films that made the icon. East of Eden, Rebel Without a Cause and Giant. Dean outshines today’s leading men.

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The Gift of Lit

Gift of Lit Library Manifesto

Library Manifesto’s book suggestions for the diverse people in your life.

1. Pen pal with a film fetish: “A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel-True 1907-1940” by Victoria Wilson

Maybe not as well know as some golden-age stars like Marilyn Monroe, Rita Hayworth, or Ginger Rogers, Barbara Stanwyck appeared in some of the greatest movies of the time and always showcased her beauty and brains. New Yorkers can see her films on the big screen this December at Film Forum.

2. Lanky nephew with a future in special collections: “The Mighty Lalouche” by Matthew Olshan (Author) and Sophie Blackall (Illustrator)

This French postman-turned-boxer children’s story wins with charming illustrations. Archival research gives the story some historical backbone.

3. Uncle who doesn’t know the difference between Marvel and D.C.: “Super Graphic A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe” By Tim Leong

Comic con veteran and clueless novices will get a laugh from the way Leong has organized the worlds of superheros and villains into info-graphics.

4. Boyfriend’s equal parts bookish and artistic dad: “Journey to the Abyss” by Harry Kessler (Author) and Laird Easton (Editor)

German aristocrat and diplomat Count Harry Kessler (1868-1937) was friendly with some of the larger than life philosophers and artists of his time: Bonnard, Stravinsky, Rodin, Renoir, Gide, Monet, Mahler, Matissee, Verlaine, George Bernard Shaw, Munch, Nietzsche, HG Wells and many others. His correspondence is a snapshot inside an important period.

5. Photography loving boyfriend in journalism school: “Watabe Yukichi, A Criminal Investigation” by Yukichi Watabe (Photographer) and Titus Boeder (Author)

This book from 2011 looks like a scrapbook from the 1950s. Watabe’s photojournalism documents a murder investigation in Japan. Minimal textual information is given, recreating the mystery in black-and-white noir scenes.

6. Best friend who sees beauty in the small stuff: “Sylvia Plath: Drawings” by Sylvia Plath (Author) and Frieda Hughes (Author)

There are certain icons in history that the public grapples to understand better. Lives cut off too short that leave questions about the personalities and passions of great artists. Sylvia Plath is one. This book of drawings unveils another layer of her psyche.

7. Co-worker with all the underground tracks: “The Riot Grrrl Collection” by Lisa Darms (Editor), Kathleen Hanna (Preface), Johanna Fateman (Introduction)

The “Riot Grrrl Collection,” is an archive of assorted DIY culture, zines and ephemera from the feminist punk rock movement surrounding Kathleen Hanna, Bikini Kill and Bratmobile. As a bonus: throw in movie tickets to “The Punk Singer” about Hanna’s impact on the music industry and the world.

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